Sunday, December 27, 2009

Wednesday, December 23, 2009

Dr. Wilbur White Stout aka Doc Stout

Scroll down through this to find a picture of Dr. Stout:

http://www.usm.edu/centennial/drawl.pdf

Dr. Stout was one of the last of the old time eccentric professors. Someone like Doctor Stout would most likely not be allowed to teach in a state university today. He taught using the Oxford University tutorial method. No lectures. Students were told to read a short story and come to class prepared to discuss it. He did take roll of class attendance but never gave any kind of written test. You might say his tests were verbal questioning of each student after they told their prepared version of some short story. He would then ask them to explain the "story of the story" or what it meant. After they did that all others in the class were given a chance to join in the discussion. You never knew from day to day who would be called on. It was best to keep your mouth shut if you did not know what you were talking about. Football players were told to sit on the back row and keep quiet. Doc told them if they would say nothing he would give them a D but if they opened their mouths to speak they(like everyone else)could get a grade from F to A depending on what they had to offer. Most of them kept quiet.

Sometimes he would come into class and write a theme topic on the blackboard and tell the class to write a theme based on that title. One I remember was "Compare Jesus Christ to a Bag of Popcorn".

Doc could be hard on unsuspecting southern belles. I remember some who quit the class in tears.

However, I also remember one of the smartest students he had was a girl who was a friend of mine. She was one of the smartest students of literature I ever met at that school.

Doctor Stout is the first professor I ever had whose main objective was to get students to think for themselves. And to learn to appreciate good literature. He would often play spoken word records of plays or short stories. Some times he would play classical music. He did not suffer fools gladly. He would hold his grade book open to the page with the students names in it. As someone spoke to offer their interpretations of a certain story or to answer one of his questions he would then mark their grade up a plus or minus depending on their answer.

He might ask a question such as "Does anyone know where the title of The Grapes of Wrath Comes From?" My friend John Childress answered that one by telling him in comes from the song The Battle Hymn of the Republic".
Wikipedia entry on "The Battle Hymn of The Republic" with lyrics and a link to an old audio version of the song:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Battle_Hymn_of_the_Republic

Doc Stout also kept open office hours after and between classes. Any student who dared or cared could go into his office and sit and talk with him. This was open to everyone and was not done by appointment. And the following article tells more of the story of this extraordinary man and teacher.
And he always smoked a corn cob pipe.

These are his papers at the University Library:
The University of Southern Mississippi -- McCain Library and Archives
Manuscripts & Archives HomeAlphabetical List of All Collections Collections Listed By Subject
Manuscript Collection
Collection Title: Stout (Wilbur White) PapersCollection Number: M137Dates: 1766; 1821; 1827; and ca. 1911-1965Volume: ca. 7.0 cu. ft. Provenance: The materials in this collection were donated to the University of Southern Mississippi by Mrs. Pauline Rogers Stout, widow of Dr. Wilbur W. Stout, in approximately 1971.Copyright: This collection may be protected from unauthorized copying by the Copyright Law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code).Biographical/Historical Sketch:
Wilbur White Stout was one of the most colorful and controversial individuals ever to dispense knowledge at the University of Southern Mississippi. As a professor of English from 1944 to 1965, and Chairman of the Division of Language and Literature from 1944 to 1950, his unique personality and unorthodox teaching methods made him a campus legend.
Dr. Stout was born on September 27, 1898, in Yadkinville, North Carolina. His parents were Henry Clay Stout and Martha Thompson Stout, both of whom were teachers in the Burlington, North Carolina public schools. His only sibling was a sister, Agnes. Stout attended the public schools in Burlington, graduating from high school in 1917. He then entered the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where he spent the next nine years earning B. A. (1921); M. A. (1922); and Ph.D (1926) degrees in English. While at UNC, he was a member of the original "Carolina Playmakers", a dramatic group founded by Professor Frederick H. Koch. Among his classmates were Thomas Wolfe and Paul Green, who became renowned playwrights.
Upon leaving UNC, Stout taught briefly at Davis and Elkins College in West Virginia, then joined the faculty of Concord State College, also in West Virginia. He later taught at Kentucky Wesleyan, Mercer University, Virginia Polytechnic Institute, and Southwestern at Memphis. While at Concord State, Dr. Stout met his future bride, Pauline Rogers, who was a student in one of his classes, and after an eight-year courtship, they were married on September 1, 1936, in Princeton, West Virginia. No children were born of the union.
In 1944, Dr. Stout (known universally as "Doc") joined the faculty of Mississippi Southern College (now the University of Southern Mississippi) as a professor of English, and Chairman of the Division of Language and Literature, which encompassed English, Journalism, Speech, Library Science, Foreign Languages, and later, the Institute of Latin American Studies.
Doc was, first and foremost, an individualist. He believed that a well-educated person was one who could stand on his own feet and think for himself, and his classroom demeanor was designed to impart that philosophy to his students. To that end, he felt justified in using provocative means, and during his tenure at MSC-USM, he built a reputation as an eccentric by employing unusual and sometimes bizarre teaching methods. For example, he would walk into class; toss an orange at a student; and tell the student to make an impromptu speech on the subject. At other times, he would climb into the classroom over the transom to get the students' attention, or hide in a large cardboard box at the back of the room to see if anyone would be curious enough to check the contents. It is also said that he often used sarcasm to jolt students out of their complacency. But the most oft-told-tale about Doc concerns a dog that wandered into his second floor classroom in College Hall. Doc is said to have picked up the dog; crossed to a window; and dropped the animal to the ground. (according to the story, the dog landed safely on all four feet). The class was then instructed to write an essay about the dog's thoughts as it was falling.
Understandably, Doc's methods were called into question on more than one occasion, the most extreme being a situation in which the father of a student felt that Stout had insulted his son. The irate parent reportedly brought a gun on campus for the express purpose of shooting the offending professor. Fortunately, the situation was resolved without bloodshed.
In 1950, Stout was replaced as Chairman of the Division of Language and Literature by Dr. Thomas D. Young, and undoubtedly his unconventional tactics provided the impetus for the move. Doc remained as a professor of English, but it has been suggested that some animosity existed between the two men as a result. Nonetheless, Stout and Young collaborated in 1951 to create a literary map of Mississippi which was endorsed by the Mississippi Education Association, and was subsequently purchased by numerous schools and libraries.
Despite his penchant for conflict, Dr. Stout's contributions to the University of Southern Mississippi were many and varied. In 1946, he instituted the English Tutorial System, which featured weekly sessions with tutors, rather than conventional classes. He served on the Graduate School faculty, and assisted with campus publications, such as the Southerner and the Student Printz. In addition, he directed dramatics for several years, and gave freely of his time and energy to build stage sets and operate sound and lighting systems for campus productions. He was considered knowledgeable in the field of music, and worked closely with the Music Department. He also participated in decorating campus buildings at Christmas, and once climbed the dome atop the Administration Building to install speakers for playing Christmas carols. (It is said that he slipped a Chinese funeral march in with the carols that year.)
During the late 1950's and early 1960's, Doc mounted an all out effort to establish an outdoor theater on college-owned property. In connection with this project, he wrote a column for the Hattiesburg American entitled "Outdoor Drama" from approximately 1954 to 1961. The fact that the necessary financial support for the project never materialized was one of the major disappointments of his life. However, due largely to Doc's efforts, a new golf course and lake were built on the property.
Coupled with his interest in building an outdoor theater was the desire to provide an original drama for its initial production. The subject chosen was Red Eagle, Creek Indian chief defeated by Andrew Jackson at Horseshoe Bend. Col. Eugene A. Wink, a graduate student at MSC who planned to use Red Eagle as the subject of his masters thesis, agreed to write the script. Subsequently, both Wink and Stout did extensive research on Indian tribes native to the southeastern United States, with emphasis on the Creeks of Alabama, and both wrote several plays and short stories about Red Eagle.
Doc enjoyed reading, listening to music, writing book reviews, and gardening. He was active in the Hattiesburg Community Drama Association, and was a member of the Hattiesburg Rotary Club and Alpha Psi Omega fraternity. He attended Trinity Episcopal Church in Hattiesburg, and though he never became a member, he initiated a fund-raising project to replace the church's antiquated organ. In addition, Doc was an aspiring author. He wrote numerous short stories and plays, and among his published works are a play, "In Dixon's Kitchen", written in 1922, while he was a student at UNC, and an article entitled, "Lamhatty's Road Map", which appeared in the April, 1964 edition of Southern Quarterly.
Doc retired in June, 1963, but continued to teach on a part time basis. He died on July 7, 1965, due to complications following surgery, and is interred in the Burlington City Cemetery, Burlington, North Carolina. On November 3, 1967, Wilbur Stout Hall, consisting of two lecture halls, was dedicated in honor of his twenty-one years of service to the University of Southern Mississippi.
Wilbur White Stout was a complex individual whom it would be impossible to adequately describe in a limited space. He was over six feet tall, with a full head of thick white hair. He smoked a corncob pipe; wore a battered felt hat; and reportedly relished his reputation as an eccentric. A colleague described him as "a man who never did what he didn't want to do", and his widow, Mrs. Pauline Stout, likened him to James Hilton's "Mr. Chips." But in the final analysis, Doc's persona was probably most aptly defined by former local journalist, Percy D. East, who said "Those who know and understand this white-haired professor swear by him. Those who do not know and understand him swear at him.
Books:
A copy of Dr. Wilbur White Stout's book The Princess of the Wind -- And Her Children (Hattiesburg, Miss.: Mississippi Southern College, 19--), call number PS2949.S76 P75 1900z, is available in the McCain Library.
Scope and Content:
This collection focuses primarily on Dr. Wilbur White Stout's interest in Native Americans and the theater, but also contains academic, historical, and personal information. While there are several items in the collection dated in the late eighteenth, and early nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the bulk of materials are confined to the period 1945-1965. The collection features a topical arrangement, and has been divided into six major series.
Series I: General Information (Boxes 1 & 2)
The majority of the materials in this series are of a personal nature, and include photographs, personal data, newsclippings and correspondence, plus seven short stories and numerous book reviews written by Dr. Stout. Among the photographs are several snapshots of Stout during the 1950's, photos of an oil portrait of Creek Indian princess, Sehoy, two photos of Charles Weatherford (son of Red Eagle), and several photos of Indian flutes. Newsclippings consist of articles written about Dr. Stout and/or the University of Southern Mississippi. Worthy of note are several biographical sketches of Stout, an April Fool spoof in which Stout is the central character (Mar. 30, 1945), and two 1955 editorials -- one endorsing Dr. R. A. McLemore for president of Mississippi Southern College, and the other denouncing Dr. R. C. Cook's quest for the same office. The correspondence provides a showcase for Stout's letter-writing style, which is often comical, candid, and curt. Examples of this style are a letter to the Hammond Organ Company (Nov. 30, 1957) and a series of letters to Andrew Turnbull (June 10 - July, 1963) in which Stout shares his memories of playwright, Thomas Wolfe. Other items of interest are royalty statements for Stout's Play, "In Dixon's Kitchen"; a copy of the Literary Map of Mississippi created by Stout and Dr. T. D. Young in 1951; maps of the MSC farm and recreational area; mementoes from Mercer University and the University of North Carolina; and three folders of music-related items (scores, folk music catalogs, and information concerning the bagpipe).
Series II: Academics (Boxes 2 - 4)
This series is composed of materials related to Stout's activities as a professor of English. The series begins with correspondence, which again demonstrates Stout's particular flair. A typical example among correspondence concerning students is an exchange between Stout and head football coach, Thad "Pie" Vann, concerning the conduct of athletes on scholarship (Sept. 15th & 18th, 1961). Next are course outlines detailing various English courses, an exam schedule, a summary of final grades in the English Department, and a folder containing individual class schedules of high school boys in grades nine through twelve (the purpose of these class schedules is not known). These items are followed by synopses of music used by Stout in his classes, including the works of such classical composers as Chopin, Liszt, Mozart, and Wagner, as well as the more contemporary Igor Stravinsky. Instructional materials in the series reflect the types of prose and poetry studied in Stout's classes and his efforts to correlate literature and music. Unique among the instructional materials are a series of classroom lectures on sound discs which were used by the English Department at MSC in approximately 1950. The voice on the recordings has been identified as that of J. T. Palmer, an instructor in the English Department, and subjects of the lectures are eighteenth century music, and English and Italian sonnets. Of additional interest is a reel-to-reel recording of a literary festival held on the MSC campus in April 1953, featuring speeches by J. F. Bozard, Kermit Hunter, and Karl Shapiro. Also in the series are short stories, plays, research papers, and an eighth grade lesson plan written by students of Stout. Newsclippings and articles in the series relate primarily to well-known authors such as William Faulkner, Thomas Wolfe, Mark Twain, and Sinclair Lewis. Educational Publications date from 1931-1962, and among the titles are Aim: A Journal of Inspired Education; The American Scholar; College News and Views; Mississippi Educational Advance; South Atlantic Bulletin; and Singers in the Dawn: A Brief Anthology of American Negro Poetry. Dispersed throughout the series are miscellaneous items such as a copy of the Picture Bulletin of the Mississippi Southern College Graduate Faculty (ca. 1950); a pamphlet entitled "Language and Literature at Mississippi Southern"; musical scores for "Alma Mater" and "Southern to the Top"; a speech entitled "In Defense of the Humanities, or the Forgotten Men of Modern Education"; and a packet entitled "Fact-Writing, Case History # 1", which is a step-by-step guide for students of factual writing. (1946).
Series III: Theater (Boxes 5 - 7)
Series III is comprised of materials related to the theater in general, as well as items pertaining to Stout's proposed outdoor theater. Among the materials are correspondence, newsclippings, speeches, maps and drawings of the proposed outdoor theater, publications, theatrical articles, and a series of programs and brochures. Correspondence in this series is devoted primarily to efforts to establish an outdoor theater at MSC, and Dr. Stout's activities in connection with the Hattiesburg Drama Association. There is a significant amount of correspondence between Stout and Kermit Hunter of the University of North Carolina, who was considered an authority on outdoor drama. Newsclippings consist chiefly of Stout's column "Outdoor Drama" (1954-1961), but also include other theater-related articles by Stout and various other authors. These are followed by a map and drawings showing the location and design of the proposed theater. Publications are next, and among them are Dramatic Workshop, Playbill, and Southern Theatre News. Theatrical articles consist of reviews of both traditional and outdoor plays. Examples are the entire text of Arthur Miller's "After the Fall", plus three reviews of the play, and an article on Japanese "Noh" theater. The majority of programs and brochures in the series are from outdoor productions such as "The Lost Colony", "Unto These Hills", and "Wilderness Road", but there are also programs from such traditional indoor productions as "Auntie Mame", "Hamlet", and "Macbeth." Also included is a small collection of programs and brochures from plays produced by the Carolina Playmakers of the University of North Carolina, plus a copy of "The Carolina Playbook", which provides a history of the Carolina Playmakers from 1918-1944. Other noteworthy items are materials relating to the Southeastern Theatre Conference, which Stout attended on a regular basis; information concerning operation of an outdoor theater; a speech by Frederick H. Koch, founder of the Carolina Playmakers; and three speeches by Wilbur Stout. Notable among Stout's speeches is "The Negro in the Temple of Democracy" (ca. 1951). The final item in the series is a selection of postcards portraying various outdoor theaters and scenes from outdoor productions.
Series IV: Native Americans (Boxes 8 - 12)
Series IV is the largest in the collection, and represents several years' research on tribes native to the southeastern United States, particularly the Creeks of Alabama. A significant amount of the research traces the history of the Creek War and the genealogy of William Weatherford (also known as Red Eagle). Red Eagle was the great grandson of Sehoy, Princess of the Wind Clan, and interestingly, Sehoy was the name chosen for the lake built at the USM golf course. Research materials in this series consist of printed matter as well as Dr. Stout's personal notes. Other items in the series are correspondence, short stories written by Stout, newsclippings, articles, publications, brochures, postcards, graphic materials, music, maps, the Cherokee alphabet, the Choctaw "Indian Lord's Prayer", artifacts, and memorabilia. Much of the correspondence in this series is between Stout and various repositories of historical information, and reflects his dogged pursuit of Red Eagle's ancestors. Short stories in the series are by-products of Stout's research, and bear such titles as "The Princess of the Wind and Her Children" and "Son of Red Eagle." A folder of newsclippings contains several interesting articles on the Choctaws of Mississippi and Red Eagle. Examples of articles copied from periodicals are "Drums of the Toli", which concerns Mississippi Choctaws, and an article about Red Eagle's famous leap into the Alabama River aboard his horse, Arrow. Publications in this series include several particularly esoteric titles. Among them are Ceremonial songs of the Creek and Yuchi Indians; The Cherokees; Laws of the Creek Nation; and This is the American Indian. The heart of the series is the research materials in boxes 10, 11, and 12. Box 10 contains primarily materials photocopied from various historical publications, and the first two folders deal with the histories of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, and Tennessee. Folder three concerns French forts in Mississippi, Alabama and Louisiana. Folders four through nine contain materials on the Creek tribe, including topical history, battles, the Creek War, and Red Eagle family members, (e.g., Alexander and Lachlan McGillivray, Peter McQueen and the Weatherfords). Folder 10 is devoted to the Chickasaw and Choctaw tribes, and folders 11 and 12 contain alphabetically arranged biographical and genealogical information on various ancestors and descendants of Red Eagle. Folder 13 houses printed materials on miscellaneous topics, and the remainder of the series (boxes 11 & 12) consists of Dr. Stout's personal notes - some typed and some handwritten. Box 11 contains chronologies of events, additional biographical and genealogical information, and miscellaneous topics. Box 12 holds a collection of 4" x 6" note cards arranged alphabetically by subject, followed by a chronology of historic events and a bibliography of sources. Other noteworthy items placed intermittently in the series are several nice watercolor drawings by MSC student, Kay Freeman; a reel-to-reel recording of Choctaw dances; a photographic copy of the original "Lamhatty's Road Map"; part of an Indian loom; and two Choctaw stick ball sticks.
Series V: Red Eagle (Box 13)
Series V consists almost exclusively of plays and short stories about Red Eagle written by Stout and Col. Eugene Wink. Completing the series are newsclippings, production notes, graphic materials, and music scores -- all related to a proposed outdoor production about Red Eagle.
Series VI: History (Box 14)
Series VI pertains to Mississippi and American history, and the most interesting item therein is a reel-to-reel recording of a memorial service held for Senator Theodore G. Bilbo (D-Miss.) in a joint session of the Mississippi House and Senate on February 9, 1948. Also in the series are an article concerning the John Ford Home in Marion County, Mississippi, and one entitled "The Story of Pascagoula." Newsclippings cover such topics as Andrew Jackson, the Natchez Trace, Amite County, Mississippi's sesquicentennial celebration, and civil rights (including articles documenting integration of the University of Mississippi in 1962). A wide range of subjects and personalities are explored in the two folders of articles copied from periodicals. Among them are the Revolutionary War; the Civil War; homes of various presidents; Jamestown, Virginia; El Dorado, Arkansas; the 145th anniversary of Liberty, Mississippi; The John Ford House; the Sevier family of Tennessee; Abraham Lincoln; and Daniel Boone. Publications in the series include a selection of small booklets concerning public buildings in colonial Williamsburg, Virginia. The Capitol describes the building in which the Virginia General Assembly met from 1704-1779; The Governor's Palace details the house built in 1705 to house Virginia's governors when Williamsburg was the state's capital. The Public Gaol chronicles the history of the Williamsburg prison from 1704-1779, and The Raleigh Tavern concerns a large tavern built prior to 1742, and named for Sir Walter Raleigh. Maps in the series are of historic Boston, British West Florida, and Augusta, Georgia. Other items of interest are photographic copies of pages from the Tuscumbia (Alabama) Patriot (1827), edited by Henry S. Foote who later became governor of Mississippi, and a photographic copy of the Floridian (Aug. 18, 1821). Rounding out the series are brochures and postcards advertising sites of historic interest in Mississippi, Tennessee, Kentucky, North Carolina, Virginia, and Louisiana.
This collection reveals much about the diverse interests of Dr. Wilbur White Stout, and would be of particular value to researchers of outdoor theater, or Native American tribes of the southeastern United States. In addition, the Academic series contains good examples of course outlines and types of instructional materials used by Stout from approximately 1939-1963.
Photograph Log: Available.
Box and Folder List:
Series I: General Information (ca.1920-1965)


Box 1

Folder 1
Photographs: M137-1 through M137-19
Folder 2
Photographs: M137-20 through M137-38
Folder 3
Photographs: M137-39 through M137-63
Folder 4
Correspondence (Aug. 23, 1946 - Nov. 26, 1953)
Folder 5
Correspondence (Mar. 8, 1954 - Aug. 21, 1961)
Folder 6
Correspondence (Feb. 18 - Dec. 4, 1963)
Folder 7
Correspondence (Jan. 21, 1964 - Apr. 17, 1965)
Folder 8
Personal Data: Dr. Stout's University of Southern Mississippi salary authorization (1963; 1965)
Folder 9
Personal Data: Alpha Psi Omega membership certificate (Jan. 28, 1940)
Folder 10
Personal Data: Royalty statements for "In Dixon's Kitchen" (1958; 1961)
Folder 11
Newsclippings: Articles about Dr. Stout (1945 - 1956; undated)
Folder 12
Newsclippings: Articles about Mississippi Southern College/University of Southern Mississippi (ca. 1945 - 1965; undated)
Folder 13
Newsclippings: Confidential, not for publication or release (1963-64)
Folder 14
Newsclippings: Book reviews by Wilbur Stout (1948 - 1964)
Folder 15
Typescripts of book reviews by Wilbur Stout (1960 - 1963; undated)
Folder 16
Booklet: Editorial reprints from the Petal Paper, by P. D. East (1957; 1959)
Folder 17
Short Story: "Ask Horace Hornbuckle", by W. W. Stout
Folder 18
Short Story: "The Crapaudine Tapestry", by W. W. Stout
Folder 19
Short Story: "Fiesta", by W. W. Stout
Folder 20
Short Story: "Grandfather Toad", by W. W. Stout
Folder 21
Short Story: "Judge Candlelight Will Dine at Home Tonight", by W. W. Stout
Folder 22
Short Story: "Just Call Me Rusty", by W. W. Stout
Folder 23
Short Story: "Mr. Tom Wants His Pen Back", by W. W. Stout
Folder 24
Story Ideas of W. W. Stout (1933)
Folder 25
Speech: "How Close Can You Come to Perfection?", by W. W. Stout
Folder 26
Literary Map of Mississippi, by Dr. Dan Young and Dr. Wilbur Stout (1951)
Folder 27
Mississippi Southern College Farm, Golf Course, & Recreational Area: Maps and golf score cards
Folder 28
University of North Carolina (ca. 1920 - 1949)
Folder 29
Mercer University, Macon, Georgia: Dedication & Homecoming program (2 copies) (Oct. 21, 1939)
Folder 30
Music: Information concerning bagpipe
Folder 31
Music: Folk music catalogs (1948; undated)
Folder 32
Music: Assorted scores


Box 2

Folder 1
Publications: The Living Wilderness (Spring, 1959)
Folder 2
Publications: Readers Digest (August, 1956)
Folder 3
Drawings and transparencies
Folder 4
Items relating to mathematics and science
Folder 5
Postcards
Folder 6
Memorabilia: Birthday card from Leon and Ivah Wilbur (ca. 1960)
Folder 7
Memorabilia: Napkin engraved "Polly & Doc" (probably from an open house at the Stouts' home)


Series II: Academics
Box 2

Folder 8
General Correspondence
Folder 9
Correspondence concerning students (1957 - 1962; undated)
Folder 10
Course Outlines: English 26 - English 76 (ca. 1939 - 1955)
Folder 11
Course Outlines: English 80 - English 85 (ca. 1940's - 1950's)
Folder 12
Exam schedule for Spring Quarter, 1965
Folder 15
Synopses of classical music used in Dr. Stout's classes
Folder 16
Instructional Materials (ca. 1952 - 1963; most undated)
Folder 17
Instructional Materials (undated)
Folder 18
Instructional Materials (undated)
Folder 19
Instructional Materials: Miscellaneous notes (ca. 1953 - 1965; most undated)
Folder 20
Instructional Materials: Miscellaneous notes (undated)


Box 3

Folder 1
Instructional Materials: Classroom lectures on sound discs (ca. 1934 - 1950)
Folder 2
Instructional Materials: Literary Map of the United States (Oversize)
Folder 3
Literary Festival: Reel-to-reel recording of speeches by J. F. Bozard, Kermit Hunter, and Karl Shapiro (Apr., 1953)
Folder 4
Short stories written by students of Dr. Stout: "The Glass Acorn" (1957)
Folder 5
Short stories written by students of Dr. Stout (1953)
Folder 6
Short stories written by students of Dr. Stout (ca. 1950's)
Folder 7
Short stories written by students of Dr. Stout (ca. 1950's)
Folder 8
Plays written by students of Dr. Stout (1950's)
Folder 9
Research papers written by students of Dr. Stout (ca. 1949)
Folder 10
Research paper written by student of Dr. Stout: "Types of Medieval Darkness" (1949)


Box 4

Folder 1
Eighth grade lesson plan written by student of Dr. Stout
Folder 2
Picture Bulletin of the Mississippi Southern College Graduate Faculty (ca. 1950)
Folder 3
Faculty and Staff News Bulletin (Nov. 2, 1956)
Folder 4
Pamphlet: "Language and Literature at Mississippi Southern (2 copies) (ca. 1950's)
Folder 5
Music: Scores for "Alma Mater" and "Southern to the Top" (ca. 1960)
Folder 6
Mississippi Southern College Alumni News (Jan., 1958)
Folder 7
Student Printz budget (1945-46)
Folder 8
Play programs (1959 - 1961; undated)
Folder 9
Division of Language and Literature Inventory (1946-47)
Folder 10
Newsclippings: Literary (1947 - 1964)
Folder 11
Article: "Myth and Organic Unity in the Wasteland", by Charles Moorman (1958)
Folder 12
Literary articles from periodicals (1931 - 1965; undated)
Folder 13
Speech: "In Defense of the Humanities, or the Forgotten Men of Modern Education" (ca. 1940's)
Folder 14
Publications: Aim, a Journal of Inspired Purposeful Education (Mar. - Aug., 1931)
Folder 15
Publications: The American Scholar (Spring, 1947)
Folder 16
Publications: College News and Views (Oct., 1943)
Folder 17
Publications: Improving the Ability to Read (1935)
Folder 18
Publications: Logic and Language (1956)
Folder 19
Publications: Minimum Standards for Graduate Degrees (1948)
Folder 20
Publications: Mississippi Educational Advance (Jan., 1949; Feb., 1950)
Folder 21
Publications: O. Henry, by C. Alphonso Smith (1921)
Folder 22
Publications: Singers in the Dawn, a Brief Anthology of American Negro Poetry, by Robert B. Eleazer (1939)
Folder 23
Publications: South Atlantic Bulletin (Dec., 1937 - Dec., 1939)
Folder 24
Publications: South Atlantic Bulletin (Feb., 1940 - Apr., 1941)
Folder 25
Publications: The South-Central Bulletin (Feb., 1941 - Feb., 1954 - not all dates are included)
Folder 26
Publications: The Survey Courses in English Literature and World Literature (1956)
Folder 27
Publications: University of North Carolina Alumni Review, Chapel Hill (May - June, 1964)
Folder 28
Publications: What the Colleges are Doing (1962 - 1963)
Folder 29
Publications: Word Study (Feb., 1949; Feb., 1954; Apr., 1962)
Folder 30
Fact-Writing, Case History # 1 (1946)
Folder 31
South-Central Modern Language Association: Program (1951); Invitation (1954)
Folder 32
Questionnaire: "Research and Scholarly Activity" (undated)
Folder 33
Songs: Words to five folk songs (undated)
Folder 34
Postcard: Mississippi Southern College Football Stadium (ca. 1950's)


Series III: Theater (ca. 1928-1965)
Box 5

Folder 1
Correspondence (Oct. 31, 1935 - Mar. 31, 1954)
Folder 2
Correspondence (Apr. 1, 1954 - Aug. 31, 1955)
Folder 3
Correspondence (July 16, 1956 - Oct. 26, 1962; undated)
Folder 4
Newsclippings: "Outdoor Drama", by Dr. W. W. Stout (1954 - 1956)
Folder 5
Newsclippings: "Outdoor Drama", by Dr. W. W. Stout (1957 - 1961)
Folder 6
Newsclippings: "Outdoor Drama" - list of headlines (undated)
Folder 7
Newsclippings: "Outdoor Drama" - typescripts of columns (undated)
Folder 8
Newsclippings: Theater-related articles written by Dr. Stout (1954 - 1963)
Folder 9
Newsclippings: Theater-related articles by various authors (1954 - 1962; undated)
Folder 10
Pamphlet: "Initial Factors in Theater Planning" (July, 1955)
Folder 11
Information concerning operation of an outdoor theater (ca. 1950's)
Folder 12
Map showing location of proposed College Farm Theater, by W. W. Stout (1950's)
Folder 13
Drawings of proposed outdoor theater (1950's)
Folder 14
Speech: "Drama in the South, the Carolina Playmakers Coming of Age", by Frederick H. Koch (1940)
Folder 15
Speech: "The Dynamic Approach to Dramatic Art", by W. W. Stout (undated)
Folder 16
Speech: "From Local Color to Blue Ribbon Drama", by Wilbur Stout (ca. 1939)
Folder 17
Speech: "The Negro in the Temple of Democracy", by Wilbur Stout (ca. 1951)
Folder 18
Article: "The Making of a Carolina Playmaker", by W. W. Stout (ca. 1930's)
Folder 19
Comparison of theater and motion pictures (undated)
Folder 20
Drama: Instructional Materials (undated)
Folder 21
Hattiesburg Community Drama Association (1954; undated)
Folder 22
"Sun-Up", a three-act play, by Lula Vollmer (1929)
Folder 23
"Othello", a farce opera (undated)
Folder 24
Notes and outline for historical drama, "Let the House Come to Order" (ca. 1950's)
Folder 25
Scenery and Lighting (ca. 1928 - 1952)
Folder 26
Sound Effects (1935 - 1941; undated)
Folder 27
Printed materials concerning sound recordings (1959; undated)
Folder 28
Sound systems (ca. 1940's - 1950's)


Box 6

Folder 1
Southeastern Theatre Conference: The Bulletin, Vols. 1 & 2 (1949 - 1950)
Folder 2
Southeastern Theatre Conference: The Bulletin, Vols. 3, 4, & 6 (1951 - 1954)
Folder 3
Southeastern Theatre Conference: The Newsletter (1953 - 1956)
Folder 4
Southeastern Theatre Conference: Programs; Register; Mailing list (1948 - 1959)
Folder 5
Publications: Equity Rules Governing Employment in Dramatic Stock (1957)
Folder 6
Publications: Dramatic Workshop (1941 - 1942)
Folder 7
Publications: Dramatics (1944 - 1945)
Folder 8
Publications: Encore (1951)
Folder 9
Publications: Evidences of the Dramatist's Technique in Henry Fielding's Novels (1941)
Folder 10
Publications: Playbill, Vol. 5, nos. 10 & 11 1961
Folder 11
Publications: The Playbill of Alpha Psi Omega (1943 - 1944)
Folder 12
Publications: Southern Theatre (1963)
Folder 13
Publications: Southern Theatre News (1957 - 1962)
Folder 14
Publications: Theatre Festival (1954)
Folder 15
Publications: Tragedy: Plays, Theory, and Criticism (1960)
Folder 16
Articles: Theatrical articles from periodicals (1931 - 1965; undated)
Folder 17
Programs and Brochures: "Auntie Mame" (undated)
Folder 18
Programs and Brochures: "Chucky Jack" (1956; 1958)
Folder 19
Programs and Brochures: "The Common Glory" (1952 - 1963)
Folder 20
Programs and Brochures: "The Confederacy" (ca. 1957)
Folder 21
Programs and Brochures: "The Founders" (1957 - 1958)


Box 7

Folder 1
Programs and Brochures: "Hamlet" (1953; undated)
Folder 2
Programs and Brochures: "Honey in the Rock" (ca. 1962)
Folder 3
Programs and Brochures: "Horn in the West" (1953 - 1958)
Folder 4
Programs and Brochures: "The Lost Colony" (1937 - 1939)
Folder 5
Programs and Brochures: "The Lost Colony" (1950 - 1957)
Folder 6
Programs and Brochures: "MacBeth", Libretto (1958)
Folder 7
Programs and Brochures: "Passion Play" (1958 - 1964)
Folder 8
Programs and Brochures: "The Stephen Foster Story" (1960 - 1961)
Folder 9
Programs and Brochures: "Thy Kingdom Come" (1957 - 1958)
Folder 10
Programs and Brochures: University of North Carolina Playmakers (ca. 1944 - 1958)
Folder 11
Programs and Brochures: "Unto These Hills" (ca. 1951 - 1957)
Folder 12
Programs and Brochures: "Voice in the Wind" (1956)
Folder 13
Programs and Brochures: "The Wild Rose", Libretto (1915)
Folder 14
Programs and Brochures: "Wilderness Road" (1955-1957)
Folder 15
Programs and Brochures: Miscellaneous productions (1954 - 1965; undated)
Folder 16
Postcards: Outdoor theaters and productions


Series IV: Native Americans (ca. 1911-1965)
Box 8

Folder 1
Correspondence (Dec. 4, 1954 - June 1, 1960)
Folder 2
Correspondence (Jan. 13, 1961 - Nov. 13, 1963)
Folder 3
Correspondence (Feb. 8 - Aug. 24, 1964)
Folder 4
Correspondence (Sept. 11, - Nov. 26, 1964)
Folder 5
Correspondence (Dec. 1, 1964 - Jan. 27, 1965)
Folder 6
Correspondence (Feb. 3 - Apr. 29, 1965)
Folder 7
Correspondence (May 1 - July 15, 1965; undated)
Folder 8
"Bulldozer, Spare Those Bones", by W. W. Stout (ca. 1950's)
Folder 9
"Hadja" (incomplete) (ca. 1950's)
Folder 10
"The Home of the Brave", version 1, by W. W. Stout (2 drafts of chapter I, ca. 1964)
Folder 11
"The Home of the Brave", version 2, by W. W. Stout (2 drafts of chapter I, ca. 1960's)
Folder 12
"The Home of the Brave", version 3, a play for outdoor stage, by W. W. Stout (1962)
Folder 13
"Lamhatty's Road Map", by W. W. Stout (Published in Southern Quarterly, Apr. 2, 1964, pp. 247-254)
Folder 14
"The Peace Path", Chapter II - 2 drafts, by W. W. Stout (ca. 1960's)
Folder 15
"The Princess of the Wind and Her Children", by W. W. Stout (ca. 1950's - 1960's)
Folder 16
"Rainbow Weather", partial manuscript, by W. W. Stout (ca. 1950's - 1960's)
Folder 17
"Son of Red Eagle", original, and one copy, by W. W. Stout (ca. 1950's - 1960's)
Folder 18
"They Lived With the Wind and Liked It", by W. W. Stout (ca. 1950's - 1960's)
Folder 19
"Wedding With the Wind", by W. W. Stout (ca. 1950's - 1960's)
Folder 20
Press Release: "Songs of the Chippewa Indians available on records from the Library of Congress" (undated)
Folder 21
Newsclippings (1954 - 1965; undated)
Folder 22
Articles: "The Account of Lamhatty", by David I. Bushnell, Jr. (1908)
Folder 23
Articles: "Battle of the Horse Slave" (undated)
Folder 24
Articles: "Cherokee-White Relations of the Southern Frontier in the Early 19th Century", by Henry T. Malone (ca. 1950's)
Folder 25
Articles: "Jackson Takes Pensacola" (undated)


Box 8

Folder 26
Articles: "Weatherford" (undated)
Folder 27
Articles photocopied from periodicals (1958 - 1964; undated)


Box 9

Folder 1
Publications: The American Indian in the Philosophy of the English and French Enlightenment (1952)
Folder 2
Publications: Arizona Highways (July, 1962)
Folder 3
Publications: Ceremonial Songs of the Creek and Yuchi Indians (1911)
Folder 4
Publications: The Cherokees (1939)
Folder 5
Publications: Laws of the Creek Nation (1960)
Folder 6
Publications: Shadows and Sunshine Along the Paths the Taensas Trod, a family history by Claudia S. Slaughter (1961)
Folder 7
Publications: This is the American Indian (1955)
Folder 8
Brochures of historic Native American sites (ca. 1950's)
Folder 9
Postcards
Folder 10
Graphic Materials: Pencil and ink drawings (ca. 1950's)
Folder 11
Graphic Materials: Watercolor drawings (ca. 1950's)
Folder 12
Graphic Materials: Transparencies & photocopies of portrait of Princess Sehoy (ca. 1950's)
Folder 13
Graphic Materials: Reproductions of photographs
Folder 14
Music: Reel-to-reel recording of Choctaw dances
Folder 15
Music: Checklist of Choctaw recordings (ca. 1950's)
Folder 16
Music: Description of Creek Indian flute (Dec. 21, 1957)
Folder 17
Music: Scores for various Native American folk songs and dances
Folder 18
Time table of early 19th century
Folder 19
Maps: (1) Maps of Indian Nations; (2) Map of Indian Languages; (3) Map of War in South Alabama; (4) Lamhatty's Road Map
Folder 20
Maps: Transparencies of Creek Territory at time of attack on Fort Mims (Aug., 1813)
Folder 21
Cherokee alphabet (1953)
Folder 22
Choctaw words to "Indian Lord's Prayer" (ca. 1956)
Folder 23
Artifacts: Part of an Indian loom (undated)
Folder 24
Artifacts: Two Choctaw stick ball sticks (undated)
Folder 25
Memorabilia: (1) Poster of Sequoia; (2) Book jacket from McGillivray of the Creeks


Box 10

Folder 1
Research: Printed materials concerning history of Alabama
Folder 2
Research: Printed Materials concerning histories of Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, and Tennessee
Folder 3
Research: Printed materials concerning French Forts
Folder 4
Research: Printed materials concerning the Creek Tribe - topical history; battles
Folder 5
Research: Printed materials concerning the Creek Tribe - Creek War
Folder 6
Research: Printed materials concerning the Creek Tribe - Alexander and Lachlan McGillivray
Folder 7
Research: Printed materials concerning the Creek Tribe - Peter McQueen
Folder 8
Research: Printed materials concerning the Creek Tribe - Weatherford
Folder 9
Research: Printed materials concerning the Creek Tribe - Miscellaneous topics
Folder 10
Research: Printed materials concerning the Chickasaw & Pascagoula Tribes
Folder 11
Research: Printed materials concerning biography/genealogy (C - H)
Folder 12
Research: Printed materials concerning biography/genealogy (M - T)
Folder 13
Research: Printed materials concerning miscellaneous topics
Folder 14
Research: Dr. Stout's Notes - "Who's Who?-- What's What?--Where's Where?, in the Creek War, 1813-14


Box 11

Folder 1
Research: Dr. Stout's Notes - Chronologies of events
Folder 2
Research: Dr. Stout's Notes - The Creek War
Folder 3
Research: Dr. Stout's Notes - Biography/genealogy (A - M)
Folder 4
Research: Dr. Stout's Notes - Biography/Genealogy (P - S)
Folder 5
Research: Dr. Stout's Notes - Biography/Genealogy (T - W)
Folder 6
Research: Dr. Stout's Notes - Native American customs & village organization
Folder 7
Research: Dr. Stout's Notes - Native American names and terms
Folder 8
Research: Dr. Stout's Notes - Fort Toulouse and Fort Maurepas
Folder 9
Research: Dr. Stout's Notes - Materials concerning plays, some generated by Col. E. A. Wink (ca. 1960's)
Folder 10
Research: Dr. Stout's Notes - Report on field trip in Alabama, by Col. E. A. Wink (1955)
Folder 11
Research: Dr. Stout's Notes - Census information
Folder 12
Research: Dr. Stout's Notes - Miscellaneous topics
Folder 13
Research: Dr. Stout's Notes - Miscellaneous topics
Folder 14
Research: Dr. Stout's Notes - Miscellaneous topics
Folder 15
Research: Dr. Stout's Notes - Miscellaneous topics
Folder 16
Research: Dr. Stout's Notes - Bibliographic information


Box 12
Research: Dr. Stout's Notes - 4 x 6 note cards (arranged alphabetically, by subject), followed by a chronology of historic events, and a bibliography of sources


Series V: Red Eagle (ca. 1956-1963)
Box 13

Folder 1
"Red Eagle and the False Fire Trail", by W. W. Stout (undated)
Folder 2
"The Previous Red Eagle", excerpts from manuscript (undated)
Folder 3
"Preface to Red Eagle", by W. W. Stout (undated)
Folder 4
"Red Eagle, the Nome De Guerre of William Weatherford", two drafts of a play by W. W. Stout (1963)
Folder 5
Early drafts of a play about Red Eagle, by Col. Eugene Wink (ca. 1950's)
Folder 6
"Red Eagle", a play for amphitheatre production, by Col. E. A. Wink (1960)
Folder 7
"Red Eagle", a saga of the settling of Mississippi Territory, for outdoor production, by Col. E. A. Wink (3 copies - 1956)
Folder 8
"Red Eagle and the Fabulous Majority", a folk opera by Col. E. A. Wink (1960)
Folder 9
"Red Eagle", By Col. E. A. Wink (2 copies - ca. 1956)
Folder 10
"Red Eagle", by Col. E. A. Wink (2 copies - with critiques by Kermit Hunter and Samuel Seldon, ca. 1956)
Folder 11
"Red Eagle", scenes I - V, by Col. E. A. Wink (ca. 1956)
Folder 12
"Red Eagle", loose pages of various drafts (ca. 1950's - 1960's)
Folder 13
Newsclippings (1955 - 1957)
Folder 14
Production notes (ca. 1956)
Folder 15
Graphic Materials: Titles and Maps
Folder 16
Graphic Materials: Illustrations of Red Eagle's leap into Alabama River during Creek War. *See story & photo in Dixie Magazine, Dec. 6, 1959, Box 8, Folder 27
Folder 17
Music scores


Series VI: History (ca. 1821-1965)
Box 14

Folder 1
Correspondence (Dec. 6, 1963 - Mar. 2, 1964)
Folder 2
Memorial service for Senator Theodore G. Bilbo on reel-to-reel tape (Feb. 9, 1948)
Folder 3
Mississippi Historical Society: Program; Papers presented at meeting (1965)
Folder 4
"John Ford Home" (undated)
Folder 5
"The Story of Pascagoula" (undated)
Folder 6
Newsclippings: Civil Rights (1961 - 1965)
Folder 7
Newsclippings: Various historical subjects (1953 - 1958; undated)
Folder 8
Newsclippings: Photographic copy of The Floridian (Aug. 18, 1821)
Folder 9
Newsclippings: Photographic copies of pages from The Tuscumbia (Alabama) Patriot, Henry S. Foote, ed. (1827)
Folder 10
Historical articles from periodicals (ca. 1929 - 1956)
Folder 11
Historical articles from periodicals (ca. 1957 - 1966)
Folder 12
Publications: The Bell Tel News (May 1956; Mar. 1961)
Folder 13
Publications: The Capitol (1936)
Folder 14
Publications: The Governor's Palace (1936)
Folder 15
Publications: The Life of Benjamin Franklin Told in Glass Murals (undated)
Folder 16
Publications: The Public Gaol (undated)
Folder 17
Publications: The Raleigh Tavern (1936)
Folder 18
Description of American Medals of the 18th and 19th centuries
Folder 19
Maps
Folder 20
Brochures advertising historic sites (ca. 1950's - 1960's)
Folder 21
Photograph of pioneer home in Little Alps, near Mentone, Alabama (undated)
Folder 22
Copy of document granting custody of children and property to widow (July 18, 1834)
Folder 23
Photograph of Gen. John Coffee, photocopied from History of Alabama, Vol. II
Folder 24
Postcards: Historic sites & objects

Created by: Bobs M. TusaPrepared and maintained byThe University of Southern Mississippi Libraries Special Collectionshttp://www.lib.usm.edu/~spcol/index.php118 College Drive #5148 Hattiesburg, MS 39406-5148Revised: November

Tuesday, December 22, 2009

Memorable Quotes From Forrest Gump

Winston Groom who wrote Forrest Gump grew up in Mobile, Alabama. His mother Ruth Groom was a high school English teacher at my high school Murphy High School. Winston Groom however went to a private military academy called UMS(University Military School) in Mobile, Alabama.

UMS Prep School:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UMS-Wright





Here is really good bio information about Winston Groom:



http://biography.jrank.org/pages/4380/Groom-Winston.html


Memorable Quotes From Forrest Gump

Forrest Gump: Will you marry me? [Jenny turns and looks at him] Forrest Gump: I'd make a good husband, Jenny. Jenny Curran: You would, Forrest. Forrest Gump: ...But you won't marry me. Jenny Curran: [sadly] ... You don't wanna marry me. Forrest Gump: Why don't you love me, Jenny? [Jenny says nothing] Forrest Gump: I'm not a smart man... but I know what love is.
[young Jenny's father is chasing her through the fields to beat her when she stops and hides] Young Jenny Curran: Dear God, make me a bird. So I could fly far. Far far away from here.
[repeated line] Forrest Gump: My momma always said, "Life was like a box of chocolates. You never know what you're gonna get."
Mrs. Gump: You have to do the best with what God gave you.
Drill Sergeant: Gump! What's your sole purpose in this army? Forrest Gump: To do whatever you tell me, drill sergeant! Drill Sergeant: God damn it, Gump! You're a god damn genius! This is the most outstanding answer I have ever heard. You must have a goddamn I.Q. of 160. You are goddamn gifted, Private Gump. Listen up, people... Forrest Gump: [narrates] Now for some reason I fit in the army like one of them round pegs. It's not really hard. You just make your bed real neat and remember to stand up straight and always answer every question with "Yes, drill sergeant." Drill Sergeant: ...Is that clear? Forrest Gump: Yes, drill sergeant!
Forrest Gump: Mama always said, dying was a part of life.
Forrest Gump: You died on a Saturday morning. And I had you placed here under our tree. And I had that house of your father's bulldozed to the ground. Momma always said dyin' was a part of life. I sure wish it wasn't. Little Forrest, he's doing just fine. About to start school again soon. I make his breakfast, lunch, and dinner every day. I make sure he combs his hair and brushes his teeth every day. Teaching him how to play ping-pong. He's really good. We fish a lot. And every night, we read a book. He's so smart, Jenny. You'd be so proud of him. I am. He, uh, wrote a letter, and he says I can't read it. I'm not supposed to, so I'll just leave it here for you. Jenny, I don't know if Momma was right or if, if it's Lieutenant Dan. I don't know if we each have a destiny, or if we're all just floating around accidental-like on a breeze, but I, I think maybe it's both. Maybe both is happening at the same time. I miss you, Jenny. If there's anything you need, I won't be far away.
Forrest Gump: He should not be hitting you, Jenny.
Forrest Gump: Lieutenant Dan. Ice cream.
Forrest Gump: And cause I was a gazillionaire, and I liked doin it so much, I cut that grass for free.
Forrest Gump: I gotta find Bubba!
Forrest Gump: Her dream had come true. She was a folk singer.
Forrest Gump: When I was in China on the All-American Ping Pong team, I just loved playing ping-pong with my Flexolite ping pong paddle.
Forrest Gump: Mama says they was magic shoes. They could take me anywhere.
Lieutenant Daniel Taylor: Have you found Jesus yet, Gump? Forrest Gump: I didn't know I was supposed to be looking for him, sir.
Forrest Gump: Lieutenant Dan, what are you doing here? Lieutenant Daniel Taylor: I'm here to try out my sea legs. Forrest Gump: But you ain't got no legs, Lieutenant Dan. Lieutenant Daniel Taylor: [mildly irritated, but understanding] Yes... yes, I know that. You wrote me a letter, you idiot!
Jenny Curran: Do you think I could fly off this bridge, Forrest? Forrest Gump: What do you mean, Jenny? Jenny Curran: Nothing.
[Forrest has finished assembling his rifle] Forrest Gump: DONE, DRILL SERGEANT! Drill Sergeant: GUUUUUUMP! Why did you put that weapon together so quickly, Gump? Forrest Gump: [confused] You told me to, Drill Sergeant? Drill Sergeant: Jesus H. Christ! [looks at stopwatch] Drill Sergeant: This is a new company record! If it wouldn't be such a waste of a damn-fine enlisted man I'd recommend you for OCS! You are gonna be a general someday, Gump, now disassemble your weapon and continue!
Bubba: Anyway, like I was sayin', shrimp is the fruit of the sea. You can barbecue it, boil it, broil it, bake it, saute it. Dey's uh, shrimp-kabobs, shrimp creole, shrimp gumbo. Pan fried, deep fried, stir-fried. There's pineapple shrimp, lemon shrimp, coconut shrimp, pepper shrimp, shrimp soup, shrimp stew, shrimp salad, shrimp and potatoes, shrimp burger, shrimp sandwich. That- that's about it.
Bubba: Have you ever been on a real shrimp boat? Forrest Gump: No, but I've been on a real big boat.
Forrest Gump: Now you wouldn't believe me if I told you, but I could run like the wind blows. From that day on, if I was ever going somewhere, I was running!
[repeated line] Forrest Gump: Stupid is as stupid does.
Pvt. Dallas from Phoenix: [Forrest is watching "Gomer Pyle U.S.M.C."] Gump, how can you watch that stupid shit? Turn it off.
Forrest Gump: You know it's funny what a young man recollects? 'Cause I don't remember bein' born. I don't recall what I got for my first Christmas and I don't know when I went on my first outdoor picnic. But I do remember the first time I heard the sweetest voice in the wide world.
Mrs. Gump: Life's a box of chocolates, Forrest. You never know what you're gonna get.
Forrest Gump: Sometimes, I guess there just aren't enough rocks.
Fat Man at Bench: It was a bullet, wasn't it? Forrest Gump: A bullet? Fat Man at Bench: That jumped up and bit you. Forrest Gump: Oh, yes sir. Bit me right in the buttocks. They said it was a million dollar wound, but the army must keep that money 'cause I still haven't seen a nickel of that million dollars.
Forrest Gump: I'm sorry I had to fight in the middle of your Black Panther party.
Bubba: My given name is Benjamin Buford Blue, but people call me Bubba. Just like one of them ol' redneck boys. Can you believe that? Forrest Gump: My name's Forrest Gump. People call me Forrest Gump.
[first lines] Forrest Gump: Hello. My name's Forrest, Forrest Gump. You want a chocolate?
Forrest Gump: I'm sorry I ruined your New Year's Eve party, Lieutenant Dan. She tasted like cigarettes.
Jenny Curran: His name's Forrest. Forrest Gump: Like me. Jenny Curran: I named him after his daddy. Forrest Gump: He got a daddy named Forrest, too? Jenny Curran: You're his daddy, Forrest.
Forrest Gump: When I got tired, I slept. When I got hungry, I ate. When I had to go, you know, I went. Elderly Southern Woman on Park Bench: And so, you just ran? Forrest Gump: Yeah.
Lieutenant Daniel Taylor: Where are you boys from in the world? Forrest Gump, Bubba: Alabama, sir! Lieutenant Daniel Taylor: You twins? Forrest Gump: No, we are not relations, sir.
Lieutenant Daniel Taylor: That's what all these cripples down at the VA talk about: Jesus this and Jesus that. They even had a priest come and talk to me. He said God is listening and if I found Jesus, I'd get to walk beside him in the kingdom of Heaven. Did you hear what I said? WALK beside him in the kingdom of Heaven! Well kiss my crippled ass. God is listening? What a crock of shit.
[repeated line] Forrest Gump: That's all I have to say about that.
Forrest Gump: Hello. I'm Forrest, Forrest Gump. Recruit Officer: Nobody gives a hunky shit who you are, pus ball. You're not even a low-life, scum-sucking maggot. Get your ass on the bus, you're in the army now!
Jenny Curran: Have you ever been with a girl, Forrest? Forrest Gump: [nervously] I sit next to them in my Home Economics class...
John F. Kennedy: Congratulations, how do you feel? Forrest Gump: I gotta pee. John F. Kennedy: [turning to camera] I believe he said he had to go pee. Heh heh.
Lyndon B. Johnson: [Putting medal on Forrest] America owes you a debt of gratitude, son. Now I understand you were wounded. Where were you hit? Forrest Gump: In the buttocks. Lyndon B. Johnson: Oh that must be a sight. [Whispering to Forrest] Lyndon B. Johnson: I'd like to see that. [Forrest shows him; Johnson walks away embarrassed] Lyndon B. Johnson: God damn, son.
Abbie Hoffman: Tell us a little bit about the war, man. Forrest Gump: The war in Vietnam? Abbie Hoffman: [to audience] War in Viet-Fucking-Nam! [Audience cheers]
Richard M. Nixon: Therefore, I shall resign the presidency effective at noon tomorrow. Vice president Ford will be sworn into office at that hour in this office.
Forrest Gump: [in the Watergate hotel; on phone with security] Yeah, sir, you might want to send a maintenance man over to that office across the way. The lights are off, and they must be looking for a fuse box, 'cause them flashlights, they keep me awake.
[Forrest has just graduated from college] Recruit Officer: Have you given any thought to your future, son? Forrest Gump: "Thought"?
[Describing Vietnam] Forrest Gump: We was always taking long walks, and we was always looking for a guy named "Charlie".
Forrest Gump: The best thing about visiting the President is the food! Now, since it was all free, and I wasn't hungry but thirsty, I must've drank me fifteen Dr. Peppers.
Forrest Gump: [dejected] No shrimp. Lieutenant Daniel Taylor: Where the Hell is this God of yours? Forrest Gump: [narrating] It's funny Lieutenant Dan said that, 'cause right then, God showed up.
Forrest Gump: My Mama always said you've got to put the past behind you before you can move on.
[Forrest Gump referring to Apple Computer] Forrest Gump: Lieutenant Dan got me invested in some kind of fruit company. So then I got a call from him, saying we don't have to worry about money no more. And I said, that's good! One less thing.
Bumper Sticker Guy: [running after Forrest] Hey man! Hey listen, I was wondering if you might help me. 'Cause I'm in the bumper sticker business and I've been trying to think of a good slogan, and since you've been such a big inspiration to the people around here I thought you might be able to help me jump into - WOAH! Man, you just ran through a big pile of dog shit! Forrest Gump: It happens. Bumper Sticker guy: What, shit? Forrest Gump: Sometimes.
Forrest Gump: [running] I had run for 3 years, 2 months, 14 days, and 16 hours. [he stops and turns around] Young Man Running: Quiet, quiet! He's gonna say something! Forrest Gump: [pause] I'm pretty tired... I think I'll go home now.
Dorothy Harris: Are you coming along? Young Forrest Gump: Mama said not to be taking rides from strangers. Dorothy Harris: This is the bus to school. Young Forrest Gump: I'm Forrest, Forrest Gump. Dorothy Harris: I'm Dorothy Harris. Young Forrest Gump: Well, now we ain't strangers anymore.
[last lines] Dorothy Harris: You understand this is the bus to the school, now, don'tcha? Forrest Gump Jr.: Of course; you're Dorothy Harris, and I'm Forrest Gump.
Jenny Curran: Were you scared in Vietnam? Forrest Gump: Yes. Well, I-I don't know. Sometimes it would stop raining long enough for the stars to come out... and then it was nice. It was like just before the sun goes to bed down on the bayou. There was always a million sparkles on the water... like that mountain lake. It was so clear, Jenny, it looked like there were two skies one on top of the other. And then in the desert, when the sun comes up, I couldn't tell where heaven stopped and the earth began. It's so beautiful. Jenny Curran: I wish I could've been there with you. Forrest Gump: You were.
Old man in barbershop: That boy sure is a runnin' fool!
Forrest Gump: Mama always had a way of explaining things so I could understand them.
Forrest Gump: What's my destiny, Mama? Mrs. Gump: You're gonna have to figure that out for yourself.
Forrest Gump: That day, for no particular reason, I decided to go for a little run. So I ran to the end of the road. And when I got there, I thought maybe I'd run to the end of town. And when I got there, I thought maybe I'd just run across Greenbow County. And I figured, since I run this far, maybe I'd just run across the great state of Alabama. And that's what I did. I ran clear across Alabama. For no particular reason I just kept on going. I ran clear to the ocean. And when I got there, I figured, since I'd gone this far, I might as well turn around, just keep on going. When I got to another ocean, I figured, since I'd gone this far, I might as well just turn back, keep right on going.
Forrest Gump: In the land of China, people hardly got nothing at all. John Lennon: No possessions? Forrest Gump: And in China they never go to church. John Lennon: No religion too? Dick Cavett: Ah. Hard to imagine. John Lennon: Well it's easy if you try, Dick.
Coach Bryant: That kid may be the stupidest son of a bitch I've ever seen, but he sure is fast!
Mrs. Gump: Remember what I told you, Forrest. You're no different than anybody else is. Did you hear what I said, Forrest? You're the same as everybody else. You are no different. Principal: Your boy's... different, Miz Gump. His IQ's 75. Mrs. Gump: Well, we're all different, Mr. Hancock. There must be something that can be done? Principal: Is there a Mr. Gump, Miz Gump? Mrs. Gump: He's on vacation.
Young Forrest Gump: Mama. What's vacation? Mrs. Gump: Vacation's when you go somewhere... and you never come back.
Jenny Curran: Do you ever dream, Forrest, about who you're gonna be? Forrest Gump: Who I'm gonna be? Jenny Curran: Yeah. Forrest Gump: Aren't-aren't I going to be me?
Jenny Curran: You can't keep trying to rescue me all the time. Forrest Gump: They was trying to grab you. Jenny Curran: A lot of people try to grab me.
Jenny Curran: Can I have a ride? Pickup-Truck Driver: Where are you going? Jenny Curran: I don't care.
Forrest Gump: He was from a long great military tradition. Somebody from his family had fought and died in every single American war. I guess you could say he had a lot to live up to.
Forrest Gump: Lieutenant Dan was always getting these funny feelings about a rock or a trail or the road, so he'd tell us to get down, shut up. Lieutenant Daniel Taylor: Get down! Shut up! Forrest Gump: So we did.
[Forrest Gump listing some of his comrades] Forrest Gump: There was Dallas, from Phoenix; Cleveland - he was from Detroit; and Tex... well, I don't remember where Tex come from.
[when the bullies from school were chasing him] Jenny Curran: Run, Forrest! Run!
[Forrest is waiting with Forrest Jr. for the school bus on little Forrest's first day of school in Greenbow. The bus arrives and little Forrest is about to board it] Forrest Gump: Forrest, don't... [pause, then] Forrest Gump: I just wanted to tell you I love you. Forrest Gump Jr.: [smiles] I love you too, Dad.
Jenny Curran: Why are you so good to me? Forrest Gump: You're my girl! Jenny Curran: [pause] I'll always be your girl.
Forrest Gump: [to Jenny] They're sendin' me to Vietnam... [Jenny is despondent] Forrest Gump: ...It's this whole 'nuther country.
[Jenny has told Forrest that she has an incurable disease, and the doctors don't know what to do] Forrest Gump: You could come home with me, to my house in Greenbow, Jenny. You and little Forrest. If you're sick, I'll take care of you. Jenny Curran: Will you marry me, Forrest? Forrest Gump: [long pause] Okay.
Lieutenant Daniel Taylor: I never thanked you for saving my life.
Young Jenny Curran: You can sit here if ya want.
Lieutenant Daniel Taylor: [while being ambushed] You guys get that pig unfucked and get it on the tree line!
Forrest Gump: So what are you doing in New York, Lt. Dan? Lieutenant Daniel Taylor: I am living off the government tit! Sucking it dry!
Forrest Gump: [Forrest narrating] Jenny taught me how to climb. And I taught her how to dangle.
Mrs. Gump: What's normal anyways?
Forrest Gump: She got the cancer and died on a Tuesday.
Principal: [after Mrs. Gump had been entertaining him] You're momma sure does care about your education, son. Principal: [Forrest remains quiet] You don't say much do you? Young Forrest Gump: [imitates the noises he has just heard] eh, eh, eh, eh, eh...
Forrest Gump: One day it started raining, and it didn't quit for four months. We been through every kind of rain there is. Little bitty stingin' rain... and big ol' fat rain. Rain that flew in sideways. And sometimes rain even seemed to come straight up from underneath.
Forrest Gump: Me and Jenny goes together like peas and carrots.
Jenny Curran: Forrest, I'm sick. Forrest Gump: Do you have a cough due to cold?
Jenny Curran: [hearing that Forrest is going to Vietnam] Listen, you promise me something, OK? Just if you're ever in trouble, don't be brave. You just run, OK? Just run away.
Richard M. Nixon: [awarding Forest U.S table tennis tournament medal in 1972] So how are you enjoying yourself in our nation's capital, son? Forrest Gump: Yes, sir. Richard M. Nixon: So where are you staying? Forrest Gump: Uh... it's called the hotel airbot. Richard M. Nixon: Oh, no, I know of this much nicer hotel that's very new. It's very modern. I'll have my people set you up and take care of it for you.
Forrest Gump: Those must be comfortable shoes, I bet you could walk all day in shoes like those and not feel a thing. Nurse at Park Bench: My feet hurt. Forrest Gump: My momma always said you can tell a lot about a person by their shoes, where the go, where they've been. I've worn lots of shoes, I bet if I think about it real hard I can remember my first pair of shoes.
Forrest Gump: Then, Bubba said something I won't ever forget. Bubba: I wanna go home. Forrest Gump: Bubba was my best good friend...
School Bus Boy: Ya can't sit heah!
Forrest Gump: Heck, it even rained at night...

George Ohr The Mad Potter of Biloxi, Mississippi

The picture above is of George Ohr The Mad Potter of Biloxi.


This is a link to an article about him from The Smithsonian Magazine.


http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/biloxi.html?c=y&page=1



And this is a link to the George Ohr Museum in Biloxi.

http://www.georgeohr.org/

Sunday, December 20, 2009

Frank Bruno Is A Serious Artist No BS

The title of the above painting by Frank Bruno is Work Hard And Save your Money. Note the donkey is being driven with a stick and chasing a carrot it will never reach. Click on the picture to enlarge it.


I knew Frank Bruno back in 1969 and 1970 in Washington, D.C.. I was working at the Corcoran Gallery of Art and knew many of the DC artists at that time. I visited Frank Bruno's apartment on Conn. Ave. at Dupont Circle. And there he showed me and some other people a few of his paintings. The one shown above is one that he showed to us. Frank is a serious artist. No BS.


If you like your art sugar coated don't bother looking at any more of his paintings. If you would like to see some visionary art click on the link below. There is a gallery page where you can see many of his paintings. He moved back to Douglas, Arizona in 1970. That is where he was originally from. It was nice to find his work on the web.
http://www.frankbruno.net/index.html
Over on the right of the above page is a link to a Gallery of his paintings. Just click on the word Gallery and then click on the individual paintings by name on that page. And check his bio page also.
This guy is a serious artist. And a very good one as well.

Saturday, December 19, 2009

Clifford Brown With Strings

Clifford Brown With Strings.
Clifford Brown With StringsYesterdays Memories of YouClifford Brown (tp) Richie Powell (pf) Barry Galbraith (g) George Morrow (b) Max Roach (ds) Neal Hefti (arr, cond) 6 violins, 2 violas, 1 violoncello Recorded at Fine Sound Studios, NYC, January 18.19.20, 1955 EmArcy MG 36005





Seeing Walt Disney in the Flesh Just Before He Died

The French Quarter in New Orleans is a very small area. It is also a place where you might see anyone at anytime. In the past I ran into and talked with Tennessee Williams in the summer of 1972 and on another occasion I ran into Bob Dylan there at the Mardi Gras of 1964. I saw Margaret Mead there at a Mardi Gras in 1966.
But the biggest surprise of all was one day in 1966 when my wife Rachel and I were walking down Royal Street and we were passing the Royal Orleans Hotel we walked past a man and I told Rachel to stop. "Do you know who that was we just walked past?" "No", she said. "That was Walt Disney", I said. More than meeting William Burroughs this passing of Walt Disney on a narrow sidewalk was the most amazing unexpected event I can remember. Walt Disney died in Dec. of 1966.

Classical Music for a Snowy Day Richter and Rostropovich

Rostropovich - Richter Beethoven. Cello Sonatas 1/13
I saw this duo in Edinburgh Scotland in late August 1964 at the Edinburgh Festival. Richter began coughing and on several occasions got up and left the stage. I think he did that at least three or more times.


I had seen Marlene Deitrich perform at the Festival a day or so before. She wowed the crowd with all her favorites. The one I liked best was "See What The Boys In The Back Room Will Have".
From "Destry Rides Again" (1939) Starring Marlene Dietrich and James Stewart. "See What the Boys in the Back Room Will Have"Text by Frank LoesserMusic by Friedrich Hollaender (as Ferderick Hollaender)Sung by Marlene Dietrich


At intermission of the Richter and Rostropovich concert I went in the foyer of the hall to smoke a cigarette and there Marlene Dietrich was standing a few feet away talking to Burt Bachrach. It is one of the few times in my life I was rendered speechless. All I could do was stare at her and she stared back at me. What could a young 24 year old like me possibly say to Marlene Deitrich?

Thursday, December 17, 2009

William Faulkner in Paris 1925 And More Info on Faulkner

The above picture was taken in 1925 of William Faulkner in the Luxembourg Gardens in Paris.
Here is a page of Faulkner quotes:
http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/William_Faulkner

The following link is to 2 recorded audios of Faulkner reading his 1950 Nobel Prize acceptance speech. One is the original speech and the other is one he recorded for the album William Faulkner Reads on Caedmon Records. That album is still in print in audio book form.
This link also provides the text of the speech.
http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/williamfaulknernobelprizeaddress.htm

And this link is to the Mississippi Writer's Page on William Faulkner.
http://www.olemiss.edu/mwp/dir/faulkner_william/index.html

Short video about the Luxembourg Gardens. There are more on the right hand side of the that page: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BYfE7MOF8ME

Outstanding video about Faulkner at the University of Virginia in 1957
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GswCn8KkP88

Finally a good video tour of William Faulkner's home Rowan Oak in Oxford, Mississippi
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zjd0PSPX1wE

Wednesday, December 16, 2009

Christmas Windows at the Gallerie Lafayette Department Store in Paris France Christmas 2009


These windows are so popular around Christmas time that the crowd is so large you can't really get near the windows. There are ten of these short videos of this year's decorations each under one minute all by the same person. Look over on the right hand side of the video page to see numbers 2 thru 10. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year. Don't you wish you were in Paris right now? Try looking at them full screen as well as normal screen.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gR98JQORAXc&feature=related

Tuesday, December 15, 2009

Kevin Sessums Mississippi Sissy Interview in Hattiesburg Mississippi Bookstore


Here is a long interview in a Hattiesburg, Mississippi Bookstore of Kevin Sessums about his book MISSISSIPPI SISSY. It is in 2 parts. They are long but they are worth watching and listening to. Kevin is originally from Forrest, Mississippi. He has lived in NYC since 1975. I like his book and I like Kevin. His book and the audio version which he reads are available from Amazon.com

Kevin is openly gay. And his memoir is about growing up gay in Mississippi in the 1960s and early 1970s. I first saw this book in a Barnes and Noble bookstore and thought I at least have to look at it and see what it is about. I was stunned to find out that not only is Kevin Sessums a fine writer he was writing about someone I had once met. He opens the book with the murder of Frank Hains who was the arts and entertainment editor of the Jackson, Miss. newspaper. I had met Frank Hains once in Hattiesburg, Miss.in 1960. He had come down to direct the play Look Homeward Angel with the college drama department. Since I was reading and enjoying Thomas Wolfe at the time I spoke to Frank Hains when I saw him eating dinner one night in one of the restaurants across from the college. One of the first things he told me was that he did not really like Thomas Wolfe's writings that much. But we talked for a bit and what I remember is that Frank was friendly and didn't mind talking to a college student. I had heard over the years that he had been murdered in Jackson,Miss. in 1975. It is even mentioned in a biography of Eudora Welty since he was a friend of Ms. Welty. So I as I read the book MISSISSIPPI SISSY I learned all the details of the death of Frank Hains.

A word of caution if you decided to read Miss. Sissy. It contains graphic descriptions of gay sex. If you are homophobic or simply don't like gays for whatever reason you should skip this book. If however you can put that aside and read this book as a great memoir of growing up gay and different in Miss. and enjoy the fact that Kevin is a highly gifted writer you will be highly rewarded with a fine reading experience. I just skipped the graphic sex scenes. They are not many anyway.

I have heard that Kevin has a new book coming out soon called I LEFT IT ON THE MOUNTAIN. It is to be a continuation of his memoirs. This book will take up his story of what happened after he moved to New York City in 1975. It should be interesting.


Interview Part 1:


Interview Part 2:





Big Joe Williams Article in Down Beat Magazine Feb. 13, 1964

Click on these pictures to enlarge them and to read the article.














Monday, December 14, 2009

Bob Dylan and Big Joe Williams With Victoria Spivey and John Hammond NYC 1962

Left to right in the above photo: Bob Dylan, Victoria Spivey, John Hammond, and Big Joe Williams. From the album Three Kings and a Queen. Photo taken March 1962.
Here is some more of the mixing of fact and fiction about Bob Dylan and Big Joe Williams.
http://www.expectingrain.com/dok/who/w/williamsbigjoe.html

Also take a look at this. Click on Enter to see some of the Spivey Records:
http://www.spiveyrecords.com/
Click on the names Bob Dylan and Big Joe Williams in the label box below to see my other posts about each of them.

Big Joe Williams BABY PLEASE DON'T GO

These are photos made in Crawford,
Mississippi after a funeral. Big Joe came by and played for us after the
wake. These photos were taken on the back porch of Mrs. Carrie Lee
Harvey's house. That is me and my wife Rachel and Big Joe Williams. April 18, 1975.
Click on all the photos to enlarge them. Check out his amp sitting in the chair and the electrical cord that goes up to a light socket.


Here is a picture of Big Joe Williams sitting in his car from 1978 and another of the pictures on the back porch in Crawford taken on April 18, 1975.

That is me in the photo above with Big Joe Williams and the 60 pound watermelon. We were in Crawford, Miss. on our way to Muscle Shoals, Alabama to do some recordings. It was late August 1978.


Here is Big Joe Williams singing his famous song BABY PLEASE DON'T GO. Big Joe Williams was born on my grandfather Stewart's farm in Crawford, Mississippi. I first met him in 1975 in Crawford and then later in 1978 went with him and my friend George Cummings(of Dr. Hook and the Medicine Show)to Muscle Shoals, Alabama where they did some recordings. Baby Please Dont Go is apparently the most recorded of all blues songs.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ikxLNaAYu5k

And here is another video of Big Joe singing Highway 49. This video was made in Crawford, Miss. outside his trailer. It was made around 1978.
This is the Wikipedia entry on Big Joe Williams. It contains good biographical information.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Joe_Williams
  
Big Joe Williams was a early influence on Bob Dylan. They knew each other in the early 1960s. Bob Dylan names Big Joe Williams as an influence on the back of his first or second album. Dylan also got Big Joe booked in Gerde's Folk City in 1962.












Extra Added Attraction: Here is a video of Willie Dixon doing I'M NERVOUS:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RQrQLvBQax0&feature=PlayList&p=EAD61F1146178EF5&index=0&playnext=1